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Tuesday, September 30, 2014

Court Rejects President Kenyatta's Request, Orders Him To Attend Status ...

Mzee Lengo Karisa afikishwa mahakamani kwa kuwashambulia Raila Odinga na...

Come and See




Raila leaves for the US again in a week's time

MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 29, 2014 - 00:00 -- FELIX OLICK
CORD leader Raila Odinga chats with senator Hassan Omar and Mombasa women Rep Mishi Mboko during a meeting at the bomas of Kenya on September 25.Photo/HEZRON NJOROGE
CORD leader Raila Odinga chats with senator Hassan Omar and Mombasa women Rep Mishi Mboko during a meeting at the bomas of Kenya on September 25.Photo/HEZRON NJOROGE
CORD leader Raila Odinga will leave for the US in a week's time for another lecture tour, shortly after his return from Germany on Tuesday.
Raila is scheduled to be in Yale University in New Haven, Connecticut.
He will give the annual Coca-Cola World Fund talk on October 9.
The trip is at the invitation of MacMillan Center, Yale University.
His main lecture is titled “Afro-Optimism: Has the Pendulum Swang Too Far?”
It will focus on Africa as the next frontier.
Information posted on the university website described the opposition leader as a champion of democracy.
“Odinga has been involved in the struggle for freedom and democracy in Kenya since the 1970s, and for his efforts was detained three times without trial,” the university stated.
Previous lecturers in the series include US Ambassador to the UN Samantha Power, first female Ireland PresidentMary Robinson and former ICC Prosecutor Luis Ocampo.
Raila will, however, likely skip an invitation to Columbia due to time constraints, as he is scheduled to lead a team of election observers in Mozambique's general elections.
He was appointed as the head of the Electoral Institute for Sustainable Democracy in Africa observers' mission to oversee Mozambique's October 15 polls.
- See more at: http://www.the-star.co.ke/news/article-191742/raila-leaves-us-again-weeks-time#sthash.yO0THT8c.dpuf

Man canes Raila twice with a big stick during Cord rally in Kwale

Monday, September 29, 2014 - 00:00 -- BY ALLOYS MUSYOKA
A man who beat Cord leader Raila Odinga and governor Salim Mvurya in Kinango market Monday is arrested Photo/Alloys Musyoka
A man who beat Cord leader Raila Odinga and governor Salim Mvurya in Kinango market Monday is arrested Photo/Alloys Musyoka
Cord's Okoa Kenya  rally in Kinango market in Kwale was interrupted briefly on Monday when a man stormed the meeting and started attacking Cord leader Raila Odinga and other coalition leaders using a stick.
Odinga and other leaders, including Kwale governor Salim Mvurya, Senator Juma Boy, Hassan Omar, Agnes Zani, James Orengo, Johnstone Muthama and MPs Hassan Mwanyoa and Zulekha Juma, were dancing when the drama started.
The old man managed to sneak among dancers and hit both Raila and Mvurya twice with the stick before bodyguards overpowered him. It was not immediately established why the man hit Raila.
Both Raila and Mvurya aides were nowhere in sight when their bosses were being punished for mistakes they didn't know. Kwale county publicity officer Omar Mwagao later wrestled the man to the ground.
Mwagao snatched the stick as the man attempted to land yet another blow at the governor who was astonished by the turn of events as Raila watched.
The man was later handed to police for questioning.
Kinango AP commander Peter Musyoka said they could not arrest and lock the man because he was mentally ill.
“We cannot arrest a mad person because we know him very well,” he told The Star.
Raila and his team later addressed the rally during their campaign in Kinango before heading to Mwangulu, LungaLunga and Diani.
- See more at: http://www.the-star.co.ke/news/article-191888/man-canes-raila-twice-big-stick-during-cord-rally-kwale#sthash.mC44bhJh.dpuf

Robert Gichuru was the Driver of Fidel Odinga’s Ill-Fated Range Rover

Robert Gichuru
The driver of thee Range Rover alleged to be owned by Fidel Odinga was one Robert Gichuru who is the son of former KPLC MD, Samuel Gichuru. Robert was alleged to have borrowed the car from Fidel to run unknown errands.
Robert who studied in the UK is also a brother-in-law to Citizen TV’s Julie Gichuru with him being the younger brother to Julie’s husband, Anthony Gichuru. It is Julie who also read the script revealing the accident. This is the second time Julie has been forced in a corner regarding such incidents.
Earlier this year, Julie refused to read a script after his own father-in-law was arrested fordrunk driving.
Robert will be presented in court on Tuesday morning.

Everyone eats except this guy


An old man attack Raila Odinga and Hon. Salim Mvurya with a walking stick

Monday, September 29, 2014

Raw: Man hits CORD leader Raila Odinga and Governor Mvurya with a cane i...

Laikipia North MP Allegedly Ejected From Plane For 'Misbehaving'

Raw: Man hits CORD leader Raila Odinga and Governor Mvurya with a cane i...

Nandi governor Cleophas Lagat dumps the Pesa Mashinani Initiative

REFERENDUM POLITICS: Raila Odinga leads CORD Coalition to Coastal Kenya ...

Fidel Vehicle Kills Cyclist

CORD Takes Okoa Kenya To The Coast

Ruto Responds To Raila

KTN Prime Full Bulletin 28th September 2014 (The murder of Kwekwe in the...

Sunday, September 28, 2014

President Uhuru Kenyatta Speaks to Kenyans in Boston

Churchill Show Season 4 Episode 30

You are invited to see AFRIZO

You are invited to see AFRIZO,  a Daystar University musical group, on Tuesday October 7, 2014 at Enon Tabernacle Baptist 2800 W Cheltenham Ave, Philadelphia, PA 19150.  Concert starts at 7 PM. 

On Thursday October 9, 2014, AFRIZO's concert will be at Old Pine Presbyterian Church 412 Pine Street Philadelphia, PA 19106. Concert starts at 7 PM. 

The concerts are free. CD sales and offering go to student scholarships. Hellen Amollo Mtawali is the lead singer. Please pass the invite to others. 

For sample music and videos visit http://www.daystarus.org/afrizo.html


About AFRIZO:
Coming all the way from Nairobi, Kenya, this dynamic group sings and dances their way through a concert full of African traditional and gospel-style music.  Afrizo (acronym for “African Zone”) will feature music from South, Central, and East Africa, drawing on rich African traditions sung in English, Swahili, and African tribal languages. The members of Afrizo are students at Daystar University and sing under the direction of celebrity singer and Daystar professor, Hellen Mtawali.

The goal of Afrizo’s tour is to raise scholarship funds for promising young people who wouldn’t otherwise be able to attend Daystar University. After the service you’ll have a chance to meet the members of Afrizo, purchase CDs, and learn more about Daystar.

Daystar University in Nairobi, Kenya is one of the largest Christian liberal arts universities in Africa.  It has over 4,400 students, and they come from over 20 African countries. 

Referendum Push: Raila Odinga and Wetangula take campaign to Kilifi

Odinga, Kenyatta In War Of Words As Plebiscite Debate Intensifies

Offside Episode 44

Friday, September 26, 2014

Jeff Koinange Live: 'Retired President Moi' teaches Jeff how to dance

Churchill-Raw-Season-2-Episode-30

Raila says referendum will benefit all Kenyans

Jeff Koinange Live [Part 1] Frome Nyambane the Comedian to being a "Reti...

Jeff Koinange Live [Part 2] From Nyambane the Comedian to being a "Retir...

Holder: I come with mixed emotions

Jeff Koinange Live [Part 3] From Nyambane the Comedian to being a "Retir...

REFERENDUM AGENDA [Part 2] : Issues in the Okoa Kenya list of questions

Apple pulls IOS software over glitches.

CORD Coalition threatens to discipline governors who won’t toe the Refer...

Thursday, September 25, 2014

Churchill-Raw-Season 2- Episode-29

Fracas an assasination attempt, claims Kibwana

URP tell Ruto to quit

Five shot in Makueni County fracas

Makueni leaders record statements over violence

Barack Obama Singing Problem by Ariana Grande

Form is temporary; class is permanent


Dad I'm hungry


Ferguson police chief goes on apology tour

Dog baby-sitting




Churchill Raw Season 2 Episode 30

STRONGER COUNTIES FOR EQUITABLE NATION-Raila

STRONGER COUNTIES FOR EQUITABLE NATION:
Remarks of the Rt. Hon Raila Odinga at the CORD General Assembly Meeting on Referendum; September 24, 2014. ‪#‎OkoaKenya‬
Our constitution opens with five powerful words: We, the People of Kenya.
I get the feeling not all of us appreciate the importance of these words. We, the People of Kenya. These five words in the preamble identify who is responsible for promulgating and upholding the foundations of the Kenya Constitution 2010.
Our intent in giving ourselves the Constitution, is laid out in the remainder of the preamble thus:
ACKNOWLEDGING the supremacy of the Almighty God:
HONOURING those who heroically struggled to bring freedom and justice to our land:
RECOGNISING the aspirations of all Kenyans for a government based on the essential values of human rights, equality, freedom, democracy, social justice and the rule of law:
EXERCISING our sovereign and inalienable right to determine the form of governance of our country and having participated fully in the making of this Constitution...
ADOPT, ENACT and give this Constitution to ourselves and to our future generations.
In the past few months, we have gone around the country, we shall continue to go around the country, for the very reason we've gathered here today: to push to change our constitution in our capacity as the people of Kenya.
The constitution of Kenya 2010 allows for a referendum to amend it.
The constitution says the referendum can be through a parliamentary route or a popular initiative. We, the people, have chosen the route of popular initiative.
In providing for amendments, the constitution of Kenya 2010 does not label any such effort as an attempt to overthrow or to slow down the government or take over power through the back door.
We commit no crime in seeking to change the constitution.
This is not a contest between Uhuru Kenyatta and Raila Odinga.
This is not a test of might or popularity between CORD and Jubilee.
Nor is it an attempt to revive or to end political careers.
It is not a battle for short term gains. We are in it for the long haul and for our country.
We are not in this because we love our government less. We are in this because we love Kenya more. And we are in it within the law for we believe in the rule of law.
So ladies and gentlemen, do not be afraid, do not feel guilty, and do not be apologetic over this journey. We, the people, are acting within the law, in the best interest of our country.
We expect the government to facilitate, not frustrate our efforts.
Many battles have been fought from this venue. At this very venue, Dr Crispin Odhiambo Mbai put the case like nobody ever did on why we need to devolve power and resources.
They vilified him. They trailed him. Eventually, they killed him. But devolution came to be.
And Kenya is a much better place today because of devolution.
In Kenya, you know you are into something big and something good when the establishment fights you viciously and gets personal. So when they vilify and stalk you, when they impute bad intentions on your part today and go all out to tarnish your standing,
it is because you have hit where it matters.
We are out to strengthen Devolution because we have seen what it can do what ails it. We have seen what County governments have done with so little money in such a short time.
I will give a few quick and random examples.
In MARSABIT, the National Government drilled only about 20 boreholes in the last 50 years.
The county government has drilled 20 boreholes in one year. Livestock is the mainstay of Marsabit.
But for 50 years, the region never built a slaughter house. Today, after one year of Devolution, Marsabit is set to perform a ground breaking ceremony for a Modern Slaughter house.
In SIAYA, there were only 3 government tractors when the County government took over in 2013.
In one year, the County Government has bought 7 tractors and hired 30. Siaya harvested 3,300 bags of maize.
Within a STRONGER COUNTIES FOR EQUITABLE NATION:
Remarks of the Rt. Hon Raila Odinga at the CORD General Assembly Meeting on Referendum; September 24, 2014.
Our constitution opens with five powerful words: We, the People of Kenya.
I get the feeling not all of us appreciate the importance of these words. We, the People of Kenya. These five words in the preamble identify who is responsible for promulgating and upholding the foundations of the Kenya Constitution 2010.
Our intent in giving ourselves the Constitution, is laid out in the remainder of the preamble thus:
ACKNOWLEDGING the supremacy of the Almighty God:
HONOURING those who heroically struggled to bring freedom and justice to our land:
RECOGNISING the aspirations of all Kenyans for a government based on the essential values of human rights, equality, freedom, democracy, social justice and the rule of law:
EXERCISING our sovereign and inalienable right to determine the form of governance of our country and having participated fully in the making of this Constitution...
ADOPT, ENACT and give this Constitution to ourselves and to our future generations.
In the past few months, we have gone around the country, we shall continue to go around the country, for the very reason we've gathered here today: to push to change our constitution in our capacity as the people of Kenya.
The constitution of Kenya 2010 allows for a referendum to amend it.
The constitution says the referendum can be through a parliamentary route or a popular initiative. We, the people, have chosen the route of popular initiative.
In providing for amendments, the constitution of Kenya 2010 does not label any such effort as an attempt to overthrow or to slow down the government or take over power through the back door.
We commit no crime in seeking to change the constitution.
This is not a contest between Uhuru Kenyatta and Raila Odinga.
This is not a test of might or popularity between CORD and Jubilee.
Nor is it an attempt to revive or to end political careers.
It is not a battle for short term gains. We are in it for the long haul and for our country.
We are not in this because we love our government less. We are in this because we love Kenya more. And we are in it within the law for we believe in the rule of law.
So ladies and gentlemen, do not be afraid, do not feel guilty, and do not be apologetic over this journey. We, the people, are acting within the law, in the best interest of our country.
We expect the government to facilitate, not frustrate our efforts.
Many battles have been fought from this venue. At this very venue, Dr Crispin Odhiambo Mbai put the case like nobody ever did on why we need to devolve power and resources.
They vilified him. They trailed him. Eventually, they killed him. But devolution came to be.
And Kenya is a much better place today because of devolution.
In Kenya, you know you are into something big and something good when the establishment fights you viciously and gets personal. So when they vilify and stalk you, when they impute bad intentions on your part today and go all out to tarnish your standing,
it is because you have hit where it matters.
We are out to strengthen Devolution because we have seen what it can do what ails it. We have seen what County governments have done with so little money in such a short time.
I will give a few quick and random examples.
In MARSABIT, the National Government drilled only about 20 boreholes in the last 50 years.
The county government has drilled 20 boreholes in one year.
Livestock is the mainstay of Marsabit.
But for 50 years, the region never built a slaughter house. Today, after one year of Devolution, Marsabit is set to perform a ground breaking ceremony for a Modern Slaughter house.
In SIAYA, there were only 3 government tractors when the County government took over in 2013.
In one year, the County Government has bought 7 tractors and hired 30. Siaya harvested 3,300 bags of maize.
Within a year, the County government put 5,000 hectares under mechanization.
This year they expect 880,000 bags.
Kisii Hospital has never had a dialysis unit since it was built in 1917.
One year after devolution, a dialysis unit is being set up by the County government.
The mortuary capacity that never exceeded 20 is expanding into 100.
The hospital is now a teaching and referral facility and a 150 bed capacity ward is coming up.
MOMBASA County mobilized 27 cars within months of taking office for police to ensure security.
At no one time in 50 years did the county manage that number of vehicles.
Last month, we were treated to the Mombasa Cultural Festival. This is a routine culture among resort and tourism cities around the world to attract visitors.
The County of Mombasa has been let down on security by an incompetent and uncaring national government.
Mombasa is set to unveil the first water desalination plant by 2016.
In Wajir, they have launched the first tarmac road-25 kilometres--since independence.
Of course these county governments are not perfect.
But then, no one is. For months, we have been asking the national government to account for the Sh15 billion that was stolen from OP. No one is talking.
When counties are strong, we have an economy firing from all cylinders. That means jobs and opportunities for youth and good living for all.
That is why we are demanding that 45 per cent of National Revenue must go to the counties to enable them carry out functions that are commensurate with this allocation including Ward development.
We want an end to the deliberate confusion around the Provincial Administration.
The Constitution requires that it be restructured to fit into devolved system. The government is busy renaming and strengthening that system. We want state departments and parastatals whose functions were fully or partially devolved to release to the counties all the funds they are holding illegally in Nairobi.
Today, the National Government is holding up to KSH 120 billion for functions already devolved.
Continuous withholding of these funds is a major source of several crises affecting the counties.
Money for class D roads which are the responsibility of County governments has not been released, nor have the roads been gazetted to formally revert to counties.
We recognize that the country’s foreign policy is role national government. However, Counties are now major centres of investment, trade and other critical sectors of economy.
We feel their voices should be heard in determining the core foreign policy direction of the country. The best scenario would have been a bipartisan approach. That would have given us a chance to debate and resolve even non referendum issues, like the relationship between the legislature and the Executive.
There are a number of areas we have gone silent on. We have gone silent on the national values and principles of governance which include integrity and transparency.
Nobody is talking about Chapter Six of the Constitution which deals with Leadership and Integrity.
There is also concern about the exclusion of MPs and Senators from appointment as Cabinet ministers (or secretaries). MPs feel they are stuck in a dead-end job with no chance of rising unless one runs for President. They can’t be ministers however long they get elected.
We missed that chance because they bipartisan approach was never given a chance. I believe it is not too late.
Is it too early for a referendum to amend the constitution?
We say No. The test is not the timing but rather the necessity.
In the USA, the Constitution came into operation on 4th March 1789 and the First Amendment was sent to the States for ratification on September 25, 1789, barely six months later.
In fact negotiations for amendment were already underway even before the Constitution itself had been fully ratified.
The South African Constitution, from which ours borrows heavily, was first amended on 28th August 1997, also barely six month since it came into operation on 4th February 1997.
In its seventeen years of existence, the South African Constitution has been amended seventeen times.
They will tell you Americans did not go to the referendum.
Yes they did not go to the referendum but that was because the government opted for dialogue.
We, the People, must now roll our sleeves from here and reach every corner of our country, for the sake of our children and grandchildren.
Thank You.
29
, the County government put 5,000 hectares under mechanization. This year they expect 880,000 bags.
Kisii Hospital has never had a dialysis unit since it was built in 1917.
One year after devolution, a dialysis unit is being set up by the County government.
The mortuary capacity that never exceeded 20 is expanding into 100.
The hospital is now a teaching and referral facility and a 150 bed capacity ward is coming up.
MOMBASA County mobilized 27 cars within months of taking office for police to ensure security.
At no one time in 50 years did the county manage that number of vehicles.
Last month, we were treated to the Mombasa Cultural Festival. This is a routine culture among resort and tourism cities around the world to attract visitors.
The County of Mombasa has been let down on security by an incompetent and uncaring national government.
Mombasa is set to unveil the first water desalination plant by 2016.
In Wajir, they have launched the first tarmac road-25 kilometres--since independence.
Of course these county governments are not perfect.
But then, no one is. For months, we have been asking the national government to account for the Sh15 billion that was stolen from OP. No one is talking.
When counties are strong, we have an economy firing from all cylinders. That means jobs and opportunities for youth and good living for all.
That is why we are demanding that 45 per cent of National Revenue must go to the counties to enable them carry out functions that are commensurate with this allocation including Ward development.
We want an end to the deliberate confusion around the Provincial Administration.
The Constitution requires that it be restructured to fit into devolved system. The government is busy renaming and strengthening that system. We want state departments and parastatals whose functions were fully or partially devolved to release to the counties all the funds they are holding illegally in Nairobi.
Today, the National Government is holding up to KSH 120 billion for functions already devolved.
Continuous withholding of these funds is a major source of several crises affecting the counties.
Money for class D roads which are the responsibility of County governments has not been released, nor have the roads been gazetted to formally revert to counties.
We recognize that the country’s foreign policy is role national government. However, Counties are now major centres of investment, trade and other critical sectors of economy.
We feel their voices should be heard in determining the core foreign policy direction of the country. The best scenario would have been a bipartisan approach. That would have given us a chance to debate and resolve even non referendum issues, like the relationship between the legislature and the Executive.
There are a number of areas we have gone silent on. We have gone silent on the national values and principles of governance which include integrity and transparency.
Nobody is talking about Chapter Six of the Constitution which deals with Leadership and Integrity.
There is also concern about the exclusion of MPs and Senators from appointment as Cabinet ministers (or secretaries). MPs feel they are stuck in a dead-end job with no chance of rising unless one runs for President. They can’t be ministers however long they get elected.
We missed that chance because they bipartisan approach was never given a chance. I believe it is not too late.
Is it too early for a referendum to amend the constitution?
We say No. The test is not the timing but rather the necessity.
In the USA, the Constitution came into operation on 4th March 1789 and the First Amendment was sent to the States for ratification on September 25, 1789, barely six months later.
In fact negotiations for amendment were already underway even before the Constitution itself had been fully ratified.
The South African Constitution, from which ours borrows heavily, was first amended on 28th August 1997, also barely six month since it came into operation on 4th February 1997.
In its seventeen years of existence, the South African Constitution has been amended seventeen times.
They will tell you Americans did not go to the referendum.
Yes they did not go to the referendum but that was because the government opted for dialogue.
We, the People, must now roll our sleeves from here and reach every corner of our country, for the sake of our children and grandchildren.
Thank You
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Jeff Koinange live with Miguna Miguna and Farah Maalim (State of the Nat...

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Raila Odinga: 'Questions remain after Westgate attack'

Raila Odinga: 'Questions remain after Westgate attack'

Kenyan opposition leader Raila Odinga, on a visit to Berlin, has been talking about the security situation in his country, one year after the Westgate attack. He is also campaigning for a referendum on the constitution.
Raila Odinga being interviewed by Andrea Schmidt
The visit of the Kenyan opposition leader Raila Odinga to Germany coincides with the first anniversary of the attack on the Westgate shopping mall in Nairobi in which more than 60 people were killed and nearly 200 injured. Islamist group al-Shabab claimed responsibility for the attack. DW's Andrea Schmidt spoke to Odinga in Berlin about Kenya's security and political situation.
DW: Mr. Odinga, how would you describe the current political climate in Kenya?
Raila Odinga: I would say generally stable, apart from the issue of referendum and security. The security situation in the country is worrying, particularly because of the threats from al-Shabab and the international terrorism. The economic situation is a little bit difficult, the inflation rate is high, the cost of living is also high for the people in the country. But generally I would say the situation is stable.
You mentioned security in the country. Just one year ago al-Shabab attacked the Westgate shopping mall in Nairobi. Videos showed the security forces looting the mall and so far nobody has taken responsibility. What's your take on that?
It's very unfortunate that to date Kenyans don't know who was responsible for the Westgate Mall attack. When the incident took place we came together, both government and the opposition, to mobilize the people in face of this threat to national security.
We urged that investigations be carried out, the president promised investigations; unfortunately later on he recanted and refused to set up a judicial commission of inquiry.
So the question is still out there: Who were they? How was it organized and how was it handled? These are very fundamental issues and we are still begging for answers.
You have been spearheading a referendum to change parts of the four-year-old constitution, collecting already more than one million signatures, but you yourself played an important role in amending the current constitution. What is it that you want to change and why do you think there is a need for its amendment now?
Well, let me take you back to the American constitution, which is a remarkable constitution. It was amended within six months of being promulgated. The same thing happened to the French constitution.
So it is not a question of longevity of implementation of the constitution that's at issue. It is whether there are flaws which require attention, and the answer is yes, there are. Particularly with regard to the devolution chapter.
The devolution chapter is a cause of concern, how wealth is shared, how revenue is shared between the national and the county government. We want a clear formula which is not vague like it is right now. Right now it is saying that it is a minimum of 15 percent, but does not fix the maximum. We want to ensure that between 40 and 45 percent of the revenue goes to the county government and the rest remains for the national government.
The other is the issue of ethnic inclusivity of our constitution, and yet another one is to protect the property rights, particularly the land issue, to reinforce the position of the National Land Commission in the constitution.
And then the other one is wealth sharing, that is things like minerals and other things like wildlife and so on, which are found in the counties, how are these dealt with in the constitution? How do we share the wealth between the county government and the national government?
Is your call for an amendment of the constitution realistic, regarding the fact that one of your demands is the disbandment of the IEBC, the Independent Electoral and Boundary Commission, despite the fact that this same commission would be responsible for this process and to handle the referendum?
We are basically talking about an overhaul of the electoral infrastructure in the country, not just the disbandment of the Electoral Commission. We are basically addressing other institutions of governance in the country. We think that these commissions are too big, too bloated. So we are saying we want to reduce the size from nine or 11 to five members.
Secondly, they should not be permanently employed. There should be like a board of directors who are presiding over an executive led by the chief executive and they are part-time, they only get sitting allowances when they meet, and then in terms of appointments we want them to be appointed by political parties rather than the way they are being appointed at the moment.
So the Electoral Commission would preside over the process. But we will insist on an independent supervision, so that they are supervised by an independent authority.
Some critics say this referendum is only a means to assume power through the backdoor. What is your response to such allegations?
That thing couldn't be further from the truth. We don't need a referendum to assume political power. As you know we said that we don't agree with the ruling of the Supreme Court.
We went to the Supreme Court to challenge the outcome of the last presidential elections. When it dismissed our 900-page evidence document and then went on to dismiss our petition, we said that we disagree but we respect the Supreme Court ruling, and as far as we are concerned we moved on, forgot about the last elections.
We will deal with the elections when the time comes but that does not mean that we do not rectify whatever we see is wrong with the current constitution ahead of the next general elections. We don't want Kenyans to go back to the ballot and face a similar fate like what happened last time.
Are you not concerned that this referendum could ignite violence in Kenya again?
I don't think so. Kenyans are very mature. Kenyans can disagree on the basis of ideas without resorting to any kind of violence. These referendums are held here in Europe almost everywhere, every year there is some kind of referendum being held.
Just tomorrow [18.09.2014] there will be one in Scotland to decide whether they want to be part of Britain or not. Thereafter, in another year or so, Britain itself is going to do a referendum to decide whether they want to remain in the EU or pull out. In Switzerland there is a referendum almost every time they want to make a major decision.
The other time there was one in Holland, in France and so on; so why should there be violence in Kenya if there is a referendum? I don't think so. I think that the time has come for Kenyan people to participate in major decision-making in their country.
Do you have the full support of your CORD alliance for the referendum?
Certainly, yes, my deputy Kalonzo Musyoka is very much with me and Moses Wetangula and the rest. But then I must also admit that there are some members of parliament who are opposed to the referendum and we are saying that is their democratic right to oppose.
We have not threatened them with the expulsion from the parties unlike our counterparts, the Jubilee Coalition, who have threatened their governors who are supporting the referendum. Unless they resign, they'd be expelled from their party. We are saying that this is retrogressive.
You should really want people to make decisions on the basis of their conscience rather than though coercion, threat and intimidation.
Turning to another topic, you are demanding the withdrawal of Kenyan troops from Somalia. What else should be done?
We are not really calling for a withdrawal of the Kenyan troops from Somalia per se. We are saying that we need to have a clear timetable of our engagement in Somalia. We have been there now for two years and I think we have done a good job. Our troops have done a commendable job.
But as you know it was passed at the AU [African Union] that countries sharing a common border with a neighboring country should not send their troops into that country because of the possibility of retaliatory attacks. That is the reason why we never had our troops in Somalia until when the al-Shabab incursions had increased sufficiently.
That's when we called it Operation Linda Inchi - that is, to defend or protect the country. And it was meant to be for a limited period of time as we helped the Somalis themselves to develop the capacity to take over the responsibility for protecting their own country.
So what we need to do is to carry on the training of the Somalis and hand over the responsibility to them gradually. That's why we demanded a clear timetable from the government, how Kenya should be disengaged from the conflict in Somalia - the same way the Americans did in Iraq and also in Afghanistan.
So most people are demanding this. Some of them want the government to be more transparent and accountable about the cost of this war to the Kenyan public, particularly in terms of loss of lives.
When they see coffins coming back from Somalia [people want] clear accountability. They also [feel] commiseration [for] the victims who have been killed in Somalia. We are demanding a more open and transparent administration of the war in Somalia.
Mr Odinga, let's turn to the political alliance between your ODM (Orange Democratic Movement) party and the Wiper Democratic Movement, headed by former Vice President Kalonzo Musyoka, under what is known as CORD. How solid is your political marriage?
I would say our political discourse is very solid because we share a number of things in common as a coalition. We had a pre-election pact that was aimed at winning the elections and then forming a coalition government.
When that did not happen, we subsequently signed a post-election pact to remain together in parliament as one coalition with one leadership in both houses of parliament, National Assembly and the Senate.
And then my colleague, the Honorable Stephen Kalonzo Musyoka, and I are leading the opposition from outside parliament, and this arrangement is working very fine. We have kept the party very active outside parliament as it should be and our team in parliament is equally very effective doing the work that should be done in a multi-party democracy.
Is CORD to contest the next election as a unified force again, and who will be the presidential candidate? You, Mr. Odinga, or Kalonzo Musyoka?
Well, we will contest the next election, there is no doubt about that. We want to remain a very strong and unified team facing the next elections. We have been through a very difficult terrain where, for example, the ruling party has tried to marginalize the opposition, and tried to coerce and bribe some of our members in parliament to oppose the coalition's positions.
We have learned the hard way, through experience. I think we are well tested as to what will happen towards elections. Of course we will review and agree, because as you know in coalitions there are always negotiations among coalition partners. So I don't want to enter the discussion of who is going to be the candidate in the next elections. We will cross that bridge when we reach it.
My last question: The International Criminal Court in The Hague might abandon the upcoming trial of President Uhuru Kenyatta because the prosecutor Fatou Bensouda may not have enough evidence. How do you see this?
Well, as you know, the case is only prosecuted on the basis of evidence. So if there is no evidence, then of course there is no case. You cannot prosecute anybody if you don't have sufficient evidence. That is our position. So there's really not much to add to that story.
Raila Odinga came second in Kenya's 2013 presidential elections, losing to Uhuru Kenyatta. He is at the forefront of a campaign for a referendum to change parts of the country's constitution
Interview: Andrea Schmidt

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